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Thread: first drift event : car setup input needed

  1. #1
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    first drift event : car setup input needed

    my local track has drifting events every 2 weeks or so.last time i was there i watched for a bit and it looks pretty fun.so i figured id give it a shot.

    my car is really setup for drag/auto x so i was wondering what lil things i could do to help out with drifting


    as it sits now the car is setup like this

    out front ive got
    1le brakes
    1le struts
    1le swaybar
    245/50/zr 16's

    which i assume i wont have to change anything out front

    out back

    ce enginering 3 way adjustable drag shocks
    1le sway bar
    1le springs
    1 busted auburn posi lmao
    245/50zr16's

    i figure if i set my drag shocks to the firmest setting and drop the sway bar out of the car should help alot.
    ive also got a mini spool to install

    i have my stock v6 springs still should i swap out the stiffer 1le's for the softer v6 springs???
    and how about tires ,y current tires grip really well and im afriad that getting the car to slide without an ebrake may be a bit hard

    i know a not so wide tire will help with that but may not offer enough foward bite while spinning to keep the car moving foward instead of spinning out or moving foward fast enough.

    ive finnaly figured out how to properly use my antilag system so i was thinking of using it on the entrance to every turn to get the tires spinning easier.


    and last but not least thoughs on using an adjustable proportioning valve to really limit rear brake apply so i can use the throttle to drive the rear tires threw the brakes real easily

    ive got the car down to 2900 pounds and im prolly gonna drop another 1-200 pounds out of the car with about 75% of that being from the rear of the car

    any thoughts or other suugestions on a setup using what i got

    im not planing on changing my setup to much i.e buying anything for this since this is pretty much prolly just a one time deal so id like to work with what i have.

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  3. #2
    I'm goin' nonlinear! Jon's Avatar
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    Fix your posi, put on a super stiff rear swaybar compared to your front (maybe just put the stock V6 bar up there and leave the 1LE in the rear), maybe some tires with a poor traction rating in the rear. No idea really, drifting goes against everything I read up and study for in regards to a proper suspension setup for RR/AutoX.
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    Front brake bias is good depending on what technique you plan to use.

    If you are going to brake while turning, front. If you are going to use the brakes to break the rear loose (I guess I wouldn't recommend it...) then bias towards rear. Option 2 is really for people who don't have the power to get a REAL drift going though.
    -Rick

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    In the mountains Bob's Avatar
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    How about more power?
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  6. #5
    Full Throttle Extreme! 99v6cam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GS Jon View Post
    put on a super stiff rear swaybar
    Agree 100%. Drove a buddy's cobalt that had a 26mm swaybar (he made it himself) out back and you could slide the rear end out if you came into the corner too fast and it's freakin fwd.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slo6 View Post
    Front brake bias is good depending on what technique you plan to use.

    If you are going to brake while turning, front. If you are going to use the brakes to break the rear loose (I guess I wouldn't recommend it...) then bias towards rear. Option 2 is really for people who don't have the power to get a REAL drift going though.
    yeah i wouldnt use the brakes to start a drift, i figured front bias would allow me to keep the turbo spooled and control my speed better. the only proplem i see with this is the potential to over heat the brakes on a few of the turns that they have on the course.though i dont think id even need to use the brakes in those.
    the course has pretty much 3 horse shoe type bends in it that are nice and long. while i was watching this is were most ppl spun out


    as far as the sway bars wouldnt it be better to be stiff in the front to keep even wieght on both front tires for better sterring control.
    and then have the back nice an loose so the rear of the car rolls and takes wieght off the inner tire as to pretty much make it easier to start sliding ?

    or would this just give the outer tire to much bite

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boosted89RS View Post
    as far as the sway bars wouldnt it be better to be stiff in the front to keep even wieght on both front tires for better sterring control.
    and then have the back nice an loose so the rear of the car rolls and takes wieght off the inner tire as to pretty much make it easier to start sliding ?

    or would this just give the outer tire to much bite
    Stiff rear sway = tailhappy. That's what you want.
    -Rick

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    I'm goin' nonlinear! Jon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boosted89RS View Post
    as far as the sway bars wouldnt it be better to be stiff in the front to keep even wieght on both front tires for better sterring control.
    I almost broke my glasses slapping myself on the forehead after reading that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GS Jon View Post
    I almost broke my glasses slapping myself on the forehead after reading that.
    ??????????????????
    lol ive never drifted before well in a racetrack setting.ive had my cars sideways enough as they are specially my old sbc t5 iroc.it just seems weird that everyone recomends the larger front bars for better control.and then for drifting u would put a large rear bar and small front bar

  11. #10
    I'm goin' nonlinear! Jon's Avatar
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    Usually people equate good control with neutral, predictable handling. Drifting is taking that assumption and blowing it out of the water. I'm not knocking the driving style, it's just that it's takes a different setup and mindset to be good at it.
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  12. #11
    Gonna eat me some peaches Driver_10's Avatar
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    Typically, (and Im no expert) Ive always found that stiff rear suspension make the tires more prone to breaking loose. Id also guess using poly bushings in the LCAs with tighten it up even more.

    Initiating drift aint hard, holding it through a curve is. If your new to it you could try e-brake skiding to get the car sideways. Once the car is side-walking, counter-steer the front wheels in the same direction as the rear wheels slide. flutter throttle to steer the car; more throttle will put you further side ways less will take you in a straighter line. Just remember countersteer, dont worry about the rear of the vehicle the throttle will steer the car. Typically youll never shift any higher than second or third gear.

    As you get better, you could try practicing the "scandanavian flick". Its a manuver where you steer in one direction to generate inertia then steer hard in the other to deflect and double the inertia in the opposite direction. It breaks the rear loose and initiates the slide. Im no good at it because I cant quite nail the brake & accellerate technique needed to do it at slow speeds.

    A good way to practice is find a large parking lot on a rainy day. Ive gotten pretty good at it so far. Ive gotten pretty decent at doing hallos (not dounuts). I cant do figure 8's though and I cant skid any faster than 30mph. But Im getting better. And note, this is in an 89 jeep cherokee (ive nearly tipped it over twice), so you'd have a much easier time then Ive had trying to learn. I started on muddy fields and then graduated up to rainy, wet parking lots. I cant mess with dry pavement though. The jeeps tires would catch and roll me over.

    I dont know squat about ideal camber or caster set-up so I cant help out there. All I do know is that you need tons of oversteer. (wouldnt drive on a rainy street though. :p)
    Gonna be quiet again for a little while, so show some patience. It will be worth the wait.
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  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Driver_10 View Post
    As you get better, you could try practicing the "scandanavian flick". Its a manuver where you steer in one direction to generate inertia then steer hard in the other to deflect and double the inertia in the opposite direction. It breaks the rear loose and initiates the slide. Im no good at it because I cant quite nail the brake & accellerate technique needed to do it at slow speeds.
    i was good at doing this in my old v8 iroc on dry roads lol noone would ride with me cause id usually havee the car sideways more then straight lmao.

    the v6 car deff has the power to do the same but working the throttle on a turbo car is deff alot harder on a turbo car then it is on a na v8,specially when going from 0 bo0st to 7+ psi.

    even at half throttle when the turbo spools its like going wot,since this is just a wanna try it out thing i may just swap fromt sway bars and take a few diff wastegate springs with me and give it a shot

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    Light Throttle discord's Avatar
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    From what I understand you'll want the whole car stiff in terms of suspension. If you watch any drift cars on the track they have very little body roll at all while they're drifting. On dirt this doesn't apply much to suspension since it's easy to kick it out due to the very little traction you already have. On pavement, your tires are going to want to stick and cause body roll accordingly. Also, a lot of people are of the opinion that helical diffs are bad for drifting since they bias instead of lock, but if yours is busted you should be okay

    I would think you should firm up your adjustable shocks, mismatch the swaybars a bit to induce an oversteer situation (like GS Jon said), bump up the psi on the rear tires, and lower psi a bit on the front to keep 'em sticky and where they should be going. You want the tires to break traction predictably, not suddenly, so you can feel what's happening and initiate when you intend to. Tire compound and tread come into play as far as that's concerned.

    Drifting is different from power sliding, though they look very similar. Drifting requires that you can chain your slides which is very difficult if the body is rolling heavily back and forth when changing directions.

    That's my take on it. Have fun out there!

    EDIT: Also, drifts around long corners require higher entry speeds and staying flatter throughout the drift will keep you from fishtailing or feeling uncomfortable during and through the exit when the weight shifts back to normal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldstreaK65 View Post
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